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Filipino Lessons » Common Expressions » Everyday Greetings to Start a Conversation

Everyday Greetings to Start a Conversation

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Trivia:
Make a good impression when meeting Filipinos by being friendly. Smile and warmly greet them. Otherwise, you’ll be labelled as suplado for men or suplada for women. It means that you are being snobbish or boastful.

Filipinos are known for being friendly people. They are warm, hospitable, and sociable. Starting a conversation is easy. Smile. Be polite. Be approachable. A simple smile and a warm greeting like the greetings on this page can help you strike up a friendly chat with Filipinos.

Standard Filipino Greeting:

Customarily, Filipinos greet each other by saying "Good Morning", "Good Evening," etc.

This greeting starts with the word “magandá which comes from the root word “gandá”, which means beauty. "Magandá" is defined as “beautiful.”

Following this word you can use a word that describes the time of the day, for example: morning (umága), noon (tangháli), afternoon (hápon), or evening (gabí).

( Note that “magandá” is changed to “magandáng” with the added "ng" letter at the end. This is done to link two words together. You'll learn more about how and why words are linked together in later lessons. )

You can see and hear some examples of the commonly used greetings in the Filipino language below:
Markup
Examples:
Good morning
Magandáng umaga
Good afternoon
Magandáng hapon
Good afternoon
Magandáng tangha
Good evening
Magandáng gabí
Markup
Examples:
Good morning
Magandang umaga
Good afternoon
Magandang hapon
Good afternoon
Magandang tanghali
Good evening
Magandang gabi
Tanghali / Noon Time:

“Tanghali” is a term not found in English, and refers to the time around Noon, or roughly from 11am to 1pm. Between these times, it is appropriate to use magandáng tanghali, instead of magandáng hapon.

Greeting Responses:

In response to a greeting, you can return the same greeting with the words “rin” or “namán” or "sa iyó" at the end.

The words "rin" and "namán" mean "also" or "too".

( The word "namán" actually has multiple other definitions based on context, which we'll get in to more in future lessons. )

"Sa iyó" is translated in English as "to you". You might hear it as the shortened form "sa 'yo," which common in both oral and written tradition.

Markup
Examples:
Good morning to you, too
Magandáng umaga rin sa iyó
Good afternoon to you, too
Magandáng hapon namán sa iyó
Markup
Examples:
Good morning to you, too
Magandang umaga rin sa iyo
Good afternoon to you, too
Magandang hapon naman sa iyo
Example Greetings Conversation:

Let's see these greetings in a conversation sample to see how these are used.
Markup
Examples:
Juan: Good morning, Jane!

Jane: Good morning, too, Juan!
Juan: Magandáng umaga, Jane!

Jane: Magandáng umaga rin sa iyó, Juan!
Juan: Good evening, Jane.

Jane: Good evening to you, too!
Juan: Magandáng gabí, Jane.

Jane: Magandáng gabí naman sa iyó
Markup
Examples:
Juan: Good morning, Jane!

Jane: Good morning, too, Juan!
Juan: Magandang umaga, Jane!

Jane: Magandang umaga rin sa iyo, Juan!
Juan: Good evening, Jane.

Jane: Good evening to you, too!
Juan: Magandang gabí, Jane.

Jane: Magandang gabí naman sa iyo

This standard greeting is easy to learn and can help open your world to conversation in the Filipino language.
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Next: Greetings Drill

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Common Expressions
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