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Filipino Lessons » Common Expressions » Expressions of Hospitality

Expressions of Hospitality

Mark Complete

Trivia:
Hospitality and welcoming traits of Filipinos are seen on how guests are warmly greeted at homes and public places such as the airport, restaurants, and hotels.

As friendly as they are known for, the hospitality of Filipinos is a common trait that can be recognized through their convivial and heartwarming character. This can typically be observed in how Filipinos pleasantly welcome their guests, whether locals or foreigners. They put their best foot forward to make them feel comfortable in their country and homes (to the extent that they may go out of their way just to assist their visitors).

Part of the Filipino culture is how they receive their guests with hospitality and respect. This is best exemplified by welcoming and letting them in their homes as soon as guest/s arrive. “Tulóy ka/kayó” is a Filipino warm welcoming expression that shows kind accommodations to their visitors. “Tulóy” means “to go on” or “to enter.” For this context, the expressions “tulóy ka/kayo” can be defined as “You may come in” or “Please come in.”

Markup
Examples:
You may come in. / Please come in
Tulóy ka.
You may come in, sir/madam. / Please come in, sir/madam.
Tulóy kayó.
Markup
Examples:
You may come in. / Please come in
Tuloy ka.
You may come in, sir/madam. / Please come in, sir/madam.
Tuloy kayo.
Upon arrival, visitors normally knock on the doors of the Filipinos and say “Tao pô?” This is a greeting of someone calling or knocking at the door. It is an abbreviation of “May tao po ba sa bahay?” In English, it is the exact translation of “Anyone home?” This is usually responded with a question “Sino silá?” “Sino” is an interrogative word that functions to ask who is it. “Sila” is a pronoun similar to “they”. For this context, it means “you”, but instead takes the plural form to show respect and politeness. The guest, then, can respond by saying “Si (name),” simply to identify who they are. “Si” is a personal topic marker that can be used in front of a proper name to refer to someone.
Markup
Examples:
Anyone home?
Tao pô?
Who is it?
Sino silá?
Markup
Examples:
Anyone home?
Tao po?
Who is it?
Sino sila?
Normally, Filipinos will have salutations and small conversations before welcoming the visitors to their home. Guests are received with “kumustà” or “magandáng umaga.” The thoughtfulness of Filipinos can be observed in how they treat their guests too. Let’s see how these expressions are used in conversations.
Markup
Examples:
Joe: Anyone home?

Jane: Who is it?

Joe: It’s Joe

Jane: How are you? Please come in!

Joe: I’m fine. Thank you.
Joe : Tao pô?

Jane: Sino silá?

Joe: Si Joe.

Jane: Kumustá? Tulóy ká!

Joe: Mabuti namán. Salamat!
Markup
Examples:
Joe: Anyone home?

Jane: Who is it?

Joe: It’s Joe

Jane: How are you? Please come in!

Joe: I’m fine. Thank you.
Joe : Tao po?

Jane: Sino sila?

Joe: Si Joe.

Jane: Kumusta? Tuloy ka!

Joe: Mabuti naman. Salamat!
Trivia:
In homes of Filipinos, food is an essential part of attending to guests. Food and drinks are prepared and are served in the best china plates and glasses to make the guests feel special and, partly, to impress them too.

To accommodate their guests, Filipinos welcome them and ask them to take a seat as a thoughtful gesture. “Umupó ka muna,” as Filipinos would say. That means “Take a seat first.” Guests are asked to sit down, while the host prepares food and drinks for them. Giving food and drinks is a traditional way of Filipinos to make their visitors feel at home and appreciated for stopping by. “Kumain ka muna” is an expression of hospitality of Filipino towards their guests, offering or inviting them to eat. This simply means “Eat first.”
Markup
Examples:
Take a seat.
Umupó ka muna.
Take a seat, sir/madam.
Umupó muna kayó.
Eat first.
Kumain ka muna.
Eat first, sir/madam.
Kumain muna kayó.
Markup
Examples:
Take a seat.
Umupo ka muna.
Take a seat, sir/madam.
Umupo muna kayo.
Eat first.
Kumain ka muna.
Eat first, sir/madam.
Kumain muna kayo.
When a guest visits the host’s house during the time they are eating, it’s just courteous to invite the guest to join them to eat. “Kain tayo!” as Filipinos would say to offer their guests to eat with them.
Markup
Examples:
Let’s eat!
Kain tayo!
Let’s eat, sir/madam!
Kain po tayo!
Markup
Examples:
Let’s eat!
Kain tayo!
Let’s eat, sir/madam!
Kain po tayo!
As the host, Filipinos would feel glad to have served and welcomed you to their homes. Due to their hospitable nature, it’s a pleasure for them to see their guests feel at home and well accommodated. This is why visitors should acknowledge this warmth and generosity of the host too, by accepting their invitation and the food that they have specially prepared. Unless you ate already and feeling full, you may respectfully decline by saying, “Salamat! Katatapos lang.” or “Salamat! Busóg pa namán.”
Markup
Examples:
Thanks! I've just had a meal.
Salamat! Katatapos lang.
Thanks! I’m still full.
Salamat! Busóg pa namán.
Markup
Examples:
Thanks! I've just had a meal.
Salamat! Katatapos lang.
Thanks! I’m still full.
Salamat! Busog pa naman.
Let's see how these expressions are used in actual conversations.
Markup
Examples:
Jane: Please come in, Joe. Take a seat.

Joe: Thanks!

Jane: Eat first
Jane: Tulóy ka, Joe. Umupó ka muna.
Joe: Salamat!

Jane: Kumain ka muna!
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks!
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat!
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks! I just finished.
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat! Katatapos lang.
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks! I’m still full.
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat! Busóg pa namán.
Markup
Examples:
Jane: Please come in, Joe. Take a seat.

Joe: Thanks!

Jane: Eat first
Jane: Tuloy ka, Joe. Umupo ka muna.
Joe: Salamat!

Jane: Kumain ka muna!
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks!
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat!
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks! I just finished.
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat! Katatapos lang.
Jane: Let’s eat, Joe!

Joe: Thanks! I’m still full.
Jane: Kain tayo, Joe!

Joe: Salamat! Busog pa naman.
Lesson Summary:
Filipinos are generous and hospitable people especially to their visitors. They would even go out of their way just to accommodate their guests. Learn these Filipino terms that express hospitality to understand the cultural context and appreciate their generosity as well.


Mark Complete

Next: Expressions of Hospitality Transcription Drills

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Common Expressions
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