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Expressions Used When Leaving or Parting Ways

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In the home of Filipinos, you will hear certain familiar phrases when it's time to leave the house. As in the culture of other nations, saying farewells is part of the Filipino habit too. Never leave the house without saying good bye and letting other people know that you are about to leave. It is just as important as the way they have welcomed you into their homes. Let's get acquainted with some commonly used expressions when parting ways with from family and friends.

Tará na / Tayo na

There are several different ways to inform others that you are about to leave or part ways. One of the most commonly used term is “Tará or "Tará na". This is the colloquial form of the expression “Tayo na”, which means “Let’s go.” These phrases are used to express an invitation to a companion to leave with them and to give a hint to others that you and your companion(s) will be departing soon. These can also be used to invite other people to go somewhere.

Both phrases can be used in casual conversations, but tará na is more commonly used nowadays, and tayo na sounds more old-fashioned.
Markup
Examples:
Let’s go.
Tará na.
Let’s go.
Tayo na.
Markup
Examples:
Let’s go.
Tara na.
Let’s go.
Tayo na.
Let's use these expressions in different situations.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Joe tells his wife that they leave and go home.

Joe: Let’s go, Jane.



Joe: Tará na, Jane.
Scenario: Jane tells her brother Andres that they leave now.

Jane: Let’s go, Andres.



Jane: Tayo na, Andres.
Scenario: Joe invites Jane to the restaurant.

Joe: Let’s go to the restaurant!



Joe: Tará na sa réstorán!
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Joe tells his wife that they leave and go home.

Joe: Let’s go, Jane.



Joe: Tara na, Jane.
Scenario: Jane tells her brother Andres that they leave now.

Jane: Let’s go, Andres.



Jane: Tayo na, Andres.
Scenario: Joe invites Jane to the restaurant.

Joe: Let’s go to the restaurant!



Joe: Tara na sa restoran!
Paalam, Tútuloy & Mauuna

”Paalam” is a formal and most known expression for "goodbye" in Filipino, although it is a bit old-fashioned.

Less formally, you can also say “Tútuloy na ako” (singular) or ”Tútuloy na kamí (plural) or “Mauuna na akó/kamí. Both of these phrases mean “I/We have to go”.
Markup
Examples:
Goodbye.
Paalam.
I have to go.
Tútuloy na akó.
We have to go.
Tútuloy na kamí
I (we) have to go , sir/madam.
Tútuloy na po akó (kamí).
I have to go.
Mauuna na akó.
We have to go.
Mauuna na kamí.
I (we) have to go, sir/madam.
Mauuna na po akó (kamí).
Markup
Examples:
Goodbye.
Paalam.
I have to go.
Tutuloy na ako.
We have to go.
Tutuloy na kami
I (we) have to go , sir/madam.
Tutuloy na po ako (kami).
I have to go.
Mauuna na ako.
We have to go.
Mauuna na kami.
I (we) have to go, sir/madam.
Mauuna na po ako (kami).
Tútuloy na akó/kamí and Mauunan a akó/kamí are informal terms that can be used as an alternative to the traditional paalam for casual conversations. In ceremonial speeches and official letters and documents, paalam is the best word choice for saying good bye. See how these phrases are used in different scenarios.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane ends her graduation speech and says goodbye to everyone.

Jane: Thank you for the lessons and memories. Good bye, everyone.



Jane: Salamat sa mga aral at alaala. Paalam sa inyóng lahát.
Scenario: Joe ends a personal letter for his teacher, Mr. Rivera, and says goodbye.

Joe: Until we meet again, Mr. Rivera. Good bye.




Joe: Hanggáng sa mulí, Ginoong Rivera. Paalam.
Scenario: Jane is about to leave the house of her friend, Vicky.

Jane: I have to go, Vicky.



Jane: Tútuloy na akó, Vicky.
Scenario: Joe and Jane are about to part ways with their friend, Vicky.

Joe: We have to go, Vicky.



Joe: Tútuloy na kamí, Vicky.
Scenario: Jane’s parents have arrived to fetch her. She informs Vicky that she is leaving.

Jane: I have to go, Vicky.




Jane: Mauuna na akó, Vicky.
Scenario: Joe and Jane are about to leave from his father’s birthday celebration.

Joe: We have to go.




Joe: Mauuna na po kamí.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Jane ends her graduation speech and says goodbye to everyone.

Jane: Thank you for the lessons and memories. Good bye, everyone.



Jane: Salamat sa mga aral at alaala. Paalam sa inyong lahat.
Scenario: Joe ends a personal letter for his teacher, Mr. Rivera, and says goodbye.

Joe: Until we meet again, Mr. Rivera. Good bye.




Joe: Hanggang sa muli, Ginoong Rivera. Paalam.
Scenario: Jane is about to leave the house of her friend, Vicky.

Jane: I have to go, Vicky.



Jane: Tutuloy na ako, Vicky.
Scenario: Joe and Jane are about to part ways with their friend, Vicky.

Joe: We have to go, Vicky.



Joe: Tutuloy na kami, Vicky.
Scenario: Jane’s parents have arrived to fetch her. She informs Vicky that she is leaving.

Jane: I have to go, Vicky.




Jane: Mauuna na ako, Vicky.
Scenario: Joe and Jane are about to leave from his father’s birthday celebration.

Joe: We have to go.




Joe: Mauuna na po kami.
Trivia:
The thoughtfulness of Filipinos can be observed in how they treat their family and friends. From the moment one enters their homes and until the time of his/her departure, one is treated with kindness and great concern.

Take Care & Come Again

When visitors/family leave the house or when parting ways with others, Filipinos say “Ingat” to say to them to take care. Usually, when visitors come to their homes and leave, Filipinos would ask them to come back again and pay a visit. “Bisita ká ulí” ( you singular ) or Bisita kayó ulí ( you plural / you all ). Others would use the phrase "dalaw ka/kayó ulî". Dalaw and bisita both mean "to visit", while ulî is a variation of the word "mulî", which means "again". With that, these expressions are simply translated as, “Please visit again!”
Markup
Examples:
Take care.
Ingat.
Please visit again.
Bisita ka ulî!
Please visit again.
Bisita kayó ulî!
Please visit again.
Dalaw ka uli''.
Please visit again.
Dalaw kayó ulî.
Markup
Examples:
Take care.
Ingat.
Please visit again.
Bisita ka uli!
Please visit again.
Bisita kayo uli!
Please visit again.
Dalaw ka uli''.
Please visit again.
Dalaw kayo uli.
The three expressions can be used in any situation, when appropriate. Read each sample conversation to know how these expressions are used.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Joe is about to leave Jane’s house

Joe: I have to go.

Jane: Take care, Joe. Please visit again.



Joe: Mauuna na akó.

Jane: Ingat ka, Joe. Bisita ka ulî.
Scenario: Joe and his son are about to part ways with Jane.

Joe: We have to go.

Jane: Take care, Joe.



Joe: Tútuloy na kamí.

Jane: Ingat kayó.
Scenario: Joe visited his grandmother and is now about to leave.

Joe: I have to go.

Grandmother: Take care, Joe. Please visit again.



Joe: Mauuna na po akó.

Grandmother: Ingat ka. Dalaw ka ulî. / Ingat ka. Bisita ka ulî.
Markup
Examples:
Scenario: Joe is about to leave Jane’s house

Joe: I have to go.

Jane: Take care, Joe. Please visit again.



Joe: Mauuna na ako.

Jane: Ingat ka, Joe. Bisita ka uli.
Scenario: Joe and his son are about to part ways with Jane.

Joe: We have to go.

Jane: Take care, Joe.



Joe: Tutuloy na kami.

Jane: Ingat kayo.
Scenario: Joe visited his grandmother and is now about to leave.

Joe: I have to go.

Grandmother: Take care, Joe. Please visit again.



Joe: Mauuna na po ako.

Grandmother: Ingat ka. Dalaw ka uli. / Ingat ka. Bisita ka uli.
Lesson Summary:
Filipinos use different expressions when leaving or parting ways. Observe these phrases and learn to use them in the correct context. In general, these expressions are sayings made when departing, and are also used as terms of endearment.


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