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Other Useful Expressions for Everyday Conversations

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There are other Filipino terms that are used in high frequency in different types of situations. Take note that some of these are meant literally, while others are rhetorical expressions only. Know how to say and when to use these properly and in context.
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Examples:
Ayaw ko / Ayoko
You may say this phrase to express distaste for something. This can be used when you want to refuse something that is offered to you. You can also use this to deny a request. The shortcut "ayoko" is commonly used in casual conversations.
Bahala ka.
It can be a negative expression, used to show a person your lack of concern by telling them to do whatever he/she wants.

It could also mean you are leaving an issue or event up to another person’s decision, without expressing a negative tone
Bahala na.
This is an expression used by Filipinos when letting go of a situation and accepting whatever comes their way.

In the Filipino cultural sense, it’s a way of handling the challenges in life by leaving it up to God.
Ewan ko
It can be used to literally say “I don’t know.”

When faced with a problem or a hopeless situation, some Filipinos blurt out this phrase to express disinterest or lack of sympathy.
Gising na!
You can hear this expression being said to someone sleeping and needs to be woken up immediately (especially for those who are running late).
Hindí balé / 'Di bale na!
On one hand, someone could say this to show an optimistic attitude and turn things around, despite the unfortunate event that has occurred.

On the other hand, the phrase could also express impatience, resulting to impassiveness and lack of interest.
Hindí ko alám
You can use this expression to simply inform someone that you do not know anything about a topic that is being talked about. If a person asks you a question you don’t know the answer to, just say “Hindí ko alám.”
Huwág na / ‘Wág ná
This expression means “nevermind” or “don’t”. You can say this to decline something that is being offered to you.

Depending on the tone of a person, this could also be used to express disappointment, resulting to disinterest
Kauntí lang / Kontí lang
This is translated as “a little bit” and can be used literally when fitting for the situation.
Magalíng! /Galíng!
You can say this when you find someone or something impressive or admirable.
Minsan
This is used to literally say “sometimes”. You can use this expression to describe the occurrence of an event, which happens from time to time.
Sayang!
Filipinos blurt out this term to express regret for a missed chance or lost opportunity.
Sigé na!
It is usually used to urge a person to do something being requested by another peron(s). For example: “Sigé ná! Sumama ka na.” Say this with an insistent tone, but not with a forceful voice.
Siguro
When you are unsure about something, this term can be used to express uncertainty about the matter at hand. For example if a person asks you: “Úulan kayá?” You can say, “Siguro.
Talagá?
This expression is used to ask the certainty or truth of the matter at hand.
Tamá na
A person saying this expression is simply telling another to stop. You can use this to tell a person to stop giving you something (e.g. food). On a different note, it's also an expression that can be used to tell a person to stop whatever he is doing.
Markup
Examples:
Ayaw ko / Ayoko
You may say this phrase to express distaste for something. This can be used when you want to refuse something that is offered to you. You can also use this to deny a request. The shortcut "ayoko" is commonly used in casual conversations.
Bahala ka.
It can be a negative expression, used to show a person your lack of concern by telling them to do whatever he/she wants.

It could also mean you are leaving an issue or event up to another person’s decision, without expressing a negative tone
Bahala na.
This is an expression used by Filipinos when letting go of a situation and accepting whatever comes their way.

In the Filipino cultural sense, it’s a way of handling the challenges in life by leaving it up to God.
Ewan ko
It can be used to literally say “I don’t know.”

When faced with a problem or a hopeless situation, some Filipinos blurt out this phrase to express disinterest or lack of sympathy.
Gising na!
You can hear this expression being said to someone sleeping and needs to be woken up immediately (especially for those who are running late).
Hindi bale / 'Di bale na!
On one hand, someone could say this to show an optimistic attitude and turn things around, despite the unfortunate event that has occurred.

On the other hand, the phrase could also express impatience, resulting to impassiveness and lack of interest.
Hindi ko alam
You can use this expression to simply inform someone that you do not know anything about a topic that is being talked about. If a person asks you a question you don’t know the answer to, just say “Hindi ko alam.”
Huwag na / ‘Wag na
This expression means “nevermind” or “don’t”. You can say this to decline something that is being offered to you.

Depending on the tone of a person, this could also be used to express disappointment, resulting to disinterest
Kaunti lang / Konti lang
This is translated as “a little bit” and can be used literally when fitting for the situation.
Magaling! /Galing!
You can say this when you find someone or something impressive or admirable.
Minsan
This is used to literally say “sometimes”. You can use this expression to describe the occurrence of an event, which happens from time to time.
Sayang!
Filipinos blurt out this term to express regret for a missed chance or lost opportunity.
Sige na!
It is usually used to urge a person to do something being requested by another peron(s). For example: “Sige na! Sumama ka na.” Say this with an insistent tone, but not with a forceful voice.
Siguro
When you are unsure about something, this term can be used to express uncertainty about the matter at hand. For example if a person asks you: “Uulan kaya?” You can say, “Siguro.
Talaga?
This expression is used to ask the certainty or truth of the matter at hand.
Tama na
A person saying this expression is simply telling another to stop. You can use this to tell a person to stop giving you something (e.g. food). On a different note, it's also an expression that can be used to tell a person to stop whatever he is doing.
Lesson Summary:
Filipinos use a lot of expressions. Some may have literal meanings, but others might mean another thing. Also, be mindful of particular tones you use to express these as it can affect how a person perceives these terms.


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