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Filipino Lessons » Filipino Numbers and Numeral Expressions » Spanish Loaned Numbers in Practice

Spanish Loaned Numbers in Practice

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These Spanish loaned numbers are used in different situations. One of the most common situations wherein these are used is when saying one’s age.
Markup
Examples:
15 years old
Kinse anyos Play audio #5157
20 years old
Beynte anyos Play audio #5155
Bente anyos Play audio #5156
Person 1: How old are you?

Person 2: 27 years old.
Person 1: Iláng taón ka na? Play audio #5158

Person 2: Beynte siyete anyos. Play audio #5159
Person 1: What is your age?

Person 2: 35 years old.
Person 1: Ano ang edád mo? Play audio #5160

Person 2: Trenta’y singko anyos. Play audio #5161
Markup
Examples:
15 years old
Kinse anyos Play audio #5157
20 years old
Beynte anyos Play audio #5155
Bente anyos Play audio #5156
Person 1: How old are you?

Person 2: 27 years old.
Person 1: Ilang taon ka na? Play audio #5158

Person 2: Beynte siyete anyos. Play audio #5159
Person 1: What is your age?

Person 2: 35 years old.
Person 1: Ano ang edad mo? Play audio #5160

Person 2: Trenta’y singko anyos. Play audio #5161
It is also very common for Filipinos to tell time with the use of these numbers.
Markup
Examples:
One o’clock
Ala-una (instead of “uno”) Play audio #5152
Two o’clock
Alas-dos Play audio #5151
Three o’clock
Alas-tres Play audio #5150
Four o’clock
Alas-kuwatro Play audio #5149
Five o’clock
Alas-singko Play audio #5148
Six o’clock
Alas-saís Play audio #5146
Seven o’clock
Alas-siyete Play audio #5145
Eight o’clock
Alas-otso Play audio #5144
Nine o’clock
Alas-nuwebe Play audio #5143
Ten o’clock
Alas-diyés Play audio #5142
Eleven o’clock
Alas-onse Play audio #5140
Twelve o’clock
Alas-dose Play audio #5139
Person 1: What time is it?

Person 2: Four o’clock.
Person 1: Anong oras na? Play audio #5137

Person 2: Alas-kuwatro. Play audio #5149
Person 1: What time is it?

Person 2: Seven o’clock in the morning.
Person 1: Anong oras na? Play audio #5137

Person 2: Alas-siyete nang umaga. Play audio #5141
Markup
Examples:
One o’clock
Ala-una (instead of “uno”) Play audio #5152
Two o’clock
Alas-dos Play audio #5151
Three o’clock
Alas-tres Play audio #5150
Four o’clock
Alas-kuwatro Play audio #5149
Five o’clock
Alas-singko Play audio #5148
Six o’clock
Alas-sais Play audio #5146
Seven o’clock
Alas-siyete Play audio #5145
Eight o’clock
Alas-otso Play audio #5144
Nine o’clock
Alas-nuwebe Play audio #5143
Ten o’clock
Alas-diyes Play audio #5142
Eleven o’clock
Alas-onse Play audio #5140
Twelve o’clock
Alas-dose Play audio #5139
Person 1: What time is it?

Person 2: Four o’clock.
Person 1: Anong oras na? Play audio #5137

Person 2: Alas-kuwatro. Play audio #5149
Person 1: What time is it?

Person 2: Seven o’clock in the morning.
Person 1: Anong oras na? Play audio #5137

Person 2: Alas-siyete nang umaga. Play audio #5141
When stating percentages or porsiyento, it is also a habit for Filipinos to use Spanish loaned numbers.
Markup
Examples:
50 percent
Singkuwenta porsiyento Play audio #5136
80 percent
Otsenta porsiyento Play audio #5135
100 percent
Siyento porsiyento Play audio #5134
Markup
Examples:
50 percent
Singkuwenta porsiyento Play audio #5136
80 percent
Otsenta porsiyento Play audio #5135
100 percent
Siyento porsiyento Play audio #5134
Keep In Mind:
Notice how Filipinos use the Spanish currency “pesos” instead of “piso?”

You’ll be surprised how often you’ll hear Filipinos use these numbers especially when in the market, when you buy from the store, or when paying the fare for a dyip or tricycle ride. It is a habit of the Filipinos to use English, Filipino, and Spanish Loaned numbers alternately, when involving money.
Markup
Examples:
20 pesos
Bente pesos Play audio #5132
45 pesos
Kuwarenta’y singko pesos Play audio #5131
50 pesos
Singkuwenta pesos Play audio #5130
Person 1: How much is this?

Person 2: 60 pesos.
Person 1: Magkano itó? Play audio #5129

Person 2: Sisenta pesos. Play audio #5154
Person 1: How much is the fare going to the market?

Person 2: 8 pesos.
Person 1: Magkano ang papuntáng palengke? Play audio #5128

Person 2: Otso pesos. Play audio #5153
Markup
Examples:
20 pesos
Bente pesos Play audio #5132
45 pesos
Kuwarenta’y singko pesos Play audio #5131
50 pesos
Singkuwenta pesos Play audio #5130
Person 1: How much is this?

Person 2: 60 pesos.
Person 1: Magkano ito? Play audio #5129

Person 2: Sisenta pesos. Play audio #5154
Person 1: How much is the fare going to the market?

Person 2: 8 pesos.
Person 1: Magkano ang papuntang palengke? Play audio #5128

Person 2: Otso pesos. Play audio #5153
Filipinos do not normally say siyento for hundreds. It would sound odd if you do! They simply say “-hundred” or “-daan”. For example: One hundred pesos, isáng daán, or sandaán.

Again, there are no exact rules in using these Spanish loaned numbers. Traditionally, Filipinos use these in certain situations as stated earlier. It is best to familiarize yourself with these numerals so you will not get confused when the person you are talking with uses Filipino and Spanish Loaned numbers alternately.
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Next: Spanish Loaned Numbers in Practice Transcription Drill

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Filipino Numbers and Numeral Expressions
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