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Do glottal stops occur other than at the end of a word?

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Author Photo by: leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 02 2019, 9:41pm CST ~ 2 mos., 5 days ago. 
Do glottal stops occur other than at the end of a word?
For example, kaibigan sounds like it has one after the first "a".
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Oct 02 2019, 9:56pm CST ~ 2 mos., 5 days ago. 
@leosmith Sure thing, they are between vowels like you mentioned...
 
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 02 2019, 10:14pm CST ~ 2 mos., 5 days ago. 
I'll try this again...having difficulties posting responses. Do all adjacent vowels have glottal stops, hence no need for annotation?
 
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Oct 03 2019, 10:25am CST ~ 2 mos., 4 days ago. 
>> Do all adjacent vowels have glottal stops, hence no need for annotation?
 
The accenting system has been around for many decades, so I can't say first hand, but that seems likely...
 
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 03 2019, 11:11am CST ~ 2 mos., 4 days ago. 
thanks!
 
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Author Photo stevesmi Rating: 0
Oct 04 2019, 9:38pm CST ~ 2 mos., 3 days ago. 
@leosmith From my limited Tagalog knowledge, I don't recall an annotation for a standalone glottal stop, but please correct me if I am incorrect in my thoughts. The grave accent, or paiwa, is an end-of-word glottal stop but also includes an emphasis (louder tone) on the preceding syllable, if I read the explanation correctly?
 
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 05 2019, 2:25pm CST ~ 2 mos., 2 days ago. 
@stevesmi The summary of the annotation system for this site (which they claim is fairly standard) is here: www.tagaloglessons.c om/lessons/lesson.ph p?lesson_id=26&csid= 33
The three accent marks are meant to stand alone without the underline, but I personally find that system somewhat complicated. I just remember that the stressed vowel is underlined, and if there's a glottal stop it will have the little hat or the falling accent mark. I ignore the rising accent mark.
 
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Author Photo stevesmi Rating: 0
Oct 05 2019, 8:47pm CST ~ 2 mos., 2 days ago. 
@leosmith I know that page and I read it in conjunction with various Filipino Language books that I bought over the years when I was vacationing here in the Phils.
It is correct that the accent marks used are the official system accent marks, that we don't have in English, that assist with the pronunciation of words. I have come across them in several educational publications and they are quite essential when using words that have meanings that can change depending on where the accent is placed and the type it is. It can be very disconcerting to find other non-official annotations used in some other educational publications.
The underlining that you refer to is a useful reminder used by this site for learners to either use the accent mark shown or to use the default accent, that is never shown, which is a louder and longer emphasis on the penultimate syllable.
(The penultimate is the one that is next-to-the-last syllable. I always refer to it as the next-to-last and I have a personal problem in calling it the second-to-last because, to my mind, that refers to the next-to-next-to-last - if you get my drift).
Regarding the other three accent marks - they should never be ignored, as you stated.
The one that you describe as a rising accent mark (that you say you ignore) is a pahilis (acute) accent mark and it is essential to fully emphasize (say louder and longer) the marked syllable.
The one that you describe as a top hat is a pakupya (circumflex) accent mark and indicates that the syllable ends with a glottal stop (is glottal-stopped) and is partially stressed (said louder but not longer because it is the last syllable).
The falling accent mark is a paiwa (grave) accent mark and indicates that the final vowel ends in a glottal stop (is glottal-stopped) but this vowel is not emphasized and it is the penultimate vowel (as in the Default stress(?) I think - personal thoughts) that receives the stress and it is fully stressed (louder and longer).
 
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Oct 06 2019, 10:51am CST ~ 2 mos., 1 day ago. 
@stevesmi ...is correct.
 
The system we use for accent marks (diacritical marks) has been the standard for roughly the past eighty years. Most educational materials use this system. ( There is another popular online Tagalog site that uses a different system that it seems they made up, which is kind of odd to me. )
 
The underlining is an added feature of this website only, to make interpretation of the accent marks a little easier for those who don’t know or want to learn the diacritical marks system.
 
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 06 2019, 12:08pm CST ~ 2 mos., 1 day ago. 
@TLDCAdmin @stevesmi Although I've seen other systems, I don't doubt that the three-accent mark system is standard. I just don't like it because it's hard to remember - you actually have to learn it to know what's going on. So I'm glad that the underline was added, even though it's (I imagine) non-standard. Because I prefer the underline I'm able to ignore the rising accent mark with no damage. I wish that the little hat and the falling accent mark were combined and the rising accent mark gone, but I understand that's not going to happen. The system in learningtagalog.com is basically what I described, but I wish they hadn't used the apostrophe for the glottal stop because it's used elsewhere in the language. No system is perfect, hehe.
 
Anyway, my purpose for this thread wasn't to complain about the annotation system; it's fine with me. I don't want to come off as argumentative. I just had that question about glottal stops which the admin answered quite nicely. Thank you very much.
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang Rating: 0
Oct 28 2019, 6:34pm CST ~ 1 mo., 9 days ago. 
When who vowels are next to each other and when there is a dash in the word like pag-ibig.
 
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Oct 29 2019, 11:51am CST ~ 1 mo., 8 days ago. 
When who vowels are next to each other and when there is a dash in the word like pag-ibig.
 
@Bituingmaykinang regarding the dash, I've seen that explained as creating a pause rather than a glottal stop. In the case of a consonant they sound identical to me to be honest, but I wonder if there is some technical difference between describing this as a glottal stop vs a pause.
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang Rating: 0
Oct 29 2019, 3:31pm CST ~ 1 mo., 8 days ago. 
@leosmith Glottal stops do sound pause to me, too. I'm not sure if there really is a difference.
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Nov 14 2019, 3:52am CST ~ 3 weeks, 1 day ago. 
The glottal stops in Tagalog are only indicated by either one of two diacritical marks - ՝ or ۸. They are only used over vowels that some words end with. The glottal stops, therefore, occur only at the end of words.
 
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