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Hi all! Wondering about the difference between the Filipino lang

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Author Photo by: Joya
May 20 2020, 10:03am CST ~ 2 weeks, 3 days ago. 
Hi all! Wondering about the difference between the Filipino language and tagalog? Or is there not much? I am very new to this!
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Author Photo jkos Badge: AdminBadge: SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 20 2020, 10:29am CST ~ 2 weeks, 3 days ago. 
Although the terms "Filipino" and "Tagalog" are often used interchangeably, according to the 1987 constitution the official language of the country of the Philippines is Filipino (and not Tagalog). Technically, Filipino is a language based on the Tagalog language with some very minor changes. The government's official position on the language has changed over the years: In 1937 the official language was named to be the regional "Tagalog" language. In 1959 the language name was changed to "Pilipino," to differentiate it from the regionally-focused "Tagalog" language. And then in 1973 and again in 1987 the language name was officially and finally changed to "Filipino" and included influences from other regional languages in the Philippines. You can read a more in depth History of the Filipino language on Wikipedia's article, here:
en.wikipedia.org/wik i/Filipino_language# History
 
Most commonly students of the language will refer to it as "Tagalog" and not Filipino, although this has changed somewhat in the past 10 years.
 
Hope this helps!
 
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Author Photo AMBoy Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 20 2020, 2:54pm CST ~ 2 weeks, 3 days ago. 
Most commonly students of the language will refer to it as "Tagalog" and not Filipino, although this has changed somewhat in the past 10 years. Hope this helps!
 
@jkos
 
Well..foreign students that is. It's very strictly called Filipino inside classrooms in the Philippines for the political unity reasons I'm sure .
 
However, I have not be asked once inside the Philippines is I speak Filipino, but I have been asked 100x if I speak "Tagalog".
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
May 20 2020, 11:31pm CST ~ 2 weeks, 2 days ago. 
Filipino is just the "official name" of Manila Tagalog. The reason is more political than linguistic. Linguists classify Filipino as a register or dialect of Tagalog
 
Think of it as Spanish vs Castillian. It's pretty much the same language.
 
One thing to remember that loanwords do not make a "new language". So the "Filipino has loanwords from other languages" does not hold candle because other regional languages are influenced by other regional languages (like Cordilleran languages having Ilocano influences and Cordilleran Ilocano having Cordilleran influences) but are still called the same language and not differentiated (except for being dialectical) by the "variant" without the influences.
If you understand Tagalog, you understand Filipino. If you understand Filipino, you understand Tagalog.
 
I hate calling Tagalog Filipino. Why? It's as if Tagalog has the monopoly of the Filipino culture. And calling Tagalog, Tagalog is more honest.
 
Using Tagalog is also more inclusive because it tends to include other dialects of Tagalog.
 
Here is an example of Marinduque Tagalog. It's quite divergent, but still Tagalog.
 
marinduquegov.blogsp ot.com/2018/01/ngani -mandin-naman-wikang -marinduque-pa.
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 21 2020, 12:25am CST ~ 2 weeks, 2 days ago. 
TL;DR This is language politics and nothing more. The official name for standard Tagalog as taught in Filipino class is FIlipino but both are used and its best not to waste time beating a dead karabaw.
 
Kasiguranin is highly divergent and classified by some linguists as a separate language (remember, there is no concrete standard for what a language is or isn't). Marinduqueño is classified as a divergent dialect of Tagalog. Kasiguranin is still very clearly Tagalic but it has a lot of influence from the languages it is by. Marinduqueño (actually two dialects with a hard east-west split) is also influenced by the languages in the surrounding islands, including borrowing pronouns (kamo)!
 
But wait! So called standard Tagalog also has a huge loan word bank from Kapampangan to the point of, you guessed it, borrowing pronouns (tayo). Language politics, being just that (politics), should be left out of any academic discussion on language. Many languages have more than one name, many languages have more than one register. No one seriously entertains these discussions in 2020. The biggest believers in the myth that Filipino is not Tagalog are often misguided by politicians and people with agendas, and these same people decry the mixing of languages in places like Davao. Davaoeño tagalog is more Filipino than the KWF standard, yet it is deviant in their eyes.
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 21 2020, 12:28am CST ~ 2 weeks, 2 days ago. 
@Bituingmaykinang @Joya
 
Just for the sake of further reading. Here is a reddit post www.reddit.com/r/Tag alog/comments/glidq3 /filipino_an_tagalog _whats_the_diff backing up what Bituingmaykinang said.
 
All though to me this horse needs to stop being beaten :V
 
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Author Photo Joya
May 21 2020, 2:26pm CST ~ 2 weeks, 2 days ago. 
Thanks for all the info!
 
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Author Photo Cuesclue
May 22 2020, 10:07am CST ~ 2 weeks, 1 day ago. 
@Joya
Hi Joya, just to make things clear Filipino is different from Tagalog. Filipino is the national language of the Philippines while Tagalog is the language used by most people in Luzon. Filipino is sounds like Tagalog because it is primarily adopted to it. Yet, Filipino is created alongside with the other languages here in the Philippines. That's why if you thoroughly study the Filipino language, you may found some words that originated from Cebuano, Kampampangan, Pangasinense, Tagalog, Bicolano and so on.
That is why it is called Filipino because the way it was developed and enriched was based on what are the existing language in the Philippines.
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
May 22 2020, 10:57am CST ~ 2 weeks, 1 day ago. 
@Cuesclue Filipino is a dialect of Tagalog. A lot of words from regional languages are adopted from other regional languages, too but they're not suddenly different language
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
May 22 2020, 10:58am CST ~ 2 weeks, 1 day ago. 
@akosikoneho
 
Some Tagalog learners at reddit are very cringy. They blame native speakers for their lack of confidence and progress. What a nice way to hide their racism by "learning languages".
 
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Author Photo akosikoneho Badge: SupporterBadge: Serious SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 22 2020, 10:17pm CST ~ 2 weeks, 0 days ago. 
@Bituingmaykinang I agree, also moderaton is pisspoor on /r/tagalog. I avoid sending new people there as well as hinative. I'd prefer they come here with educated natives and advanced non natives.
 
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Author Photo Bituingmaykinang
May 23 2020, 3:17pm CST ~ 1 week, 7 days ago. 
@akosikoneho Some even have the gall to tell native speakers how they "should" speak Tagalog (the very formal way). They seem to be deflecting their laziness or inability to pick up colloquialisms and regionalisms. Their heads will probably explode when someone tries to speak with them in "Beki language". Lol
 
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Author Photo Lolodave1214
May 26 2020, 9:38am CST ~ 1 week, 4 days ago. 
Ok in 1983 Tagalog became the official language of the Philippines it is comprised of several different languages Spanish, Chinese, American english and the original palonizon language of the Philippines now there is not much difference between Tagalog and Philipino language they use basicly the same words. Now my wife speaks Tagalog only when speaking to her family and friends but when she speaks to me she uses both english and tagalog. From what I understand it depends on where you live in the Philippines as to what language is spoken I hope this helps
 
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Author Photo Redlotus45 Badge: Native Tagalog Speaker
May 30 2020, 11:09am CST ~ 6 days ago. 
EBOLUSYON NG WIKANG PAMBANSA
 
Disyembre 30, 1937 – iprinoklamang ang wikang Tagalog ang magiging batayan ng Wikang Pambansa. Magkakabisa ang proklamasyong ito dalawang taon matapos itong mapagtibay.
 
1940 – ipinag-utos ang pagtuturo ng Wikang Pambansa sa ikaapat na taon sa lahat ng pampubliko at pribadong paaralan at sa mga pribadong institusyong pasanayang pangguro sa buong bansa.
 
Hunyo 4, 1946 – nagkabisa ang Batas Komonwelt Blg. 570 na pinagtibay ng Pambansang Asambleya noong Hunyo 7, 1940 na nagproklama na ang Wikang Pambansa na tatawaging Wikang Pambansang Pilipino ay isa nang wikang opisyal.
 
1959 – ibinaba ng Kalihim Jose B. Romero ng Edukasyon ang Kautusang Pangkagawaran Blg. 7 nanagsasaad na ang Wikang Pambansa ay tatawaging Pilipino upang mailagan na ang mahabang katawagang “Wikang Pambansang Pilipino” o “Wikang Pambansa Batay sa Tagalog”.
 
1987 – Filipino na ang ngalan ng wikang pambansa, alinsunod sa Konstitusyon na nagtatadhanang “ang wikang pambansa ng Pilipinas ay Filipino.” Ito ay hindi pinaghalu-halong sangkap mula sa iba’t ibang katutubong wika; bagkus, ito’y may nucleus, ang Pilipino o Tagalog.
 
kwf.gov.ph/kasaysaya n-at-mandato/
 
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Author Photo jkos Badge: AdminBadge: SupporterBadge: VIP Supporter
May 30 2020, 1:03pm CST ~ 6 days ago. 
@Redlotus45 Thanks for posting! I added this to the Reader as well, here:
 
www.tagaloglessons.c om/reader-assist/vie w.php?notepad_item_i d=707&c=c945c99
 
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