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Kaya is defined as ability, capable, and able. And in the exampl

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Author Photo by: stevesmi Rating: 0
Aug 02 2019, 10:17am CST ~ 3 weeks, 3 days ago. 
Kaya is defined as ability, capable, and able. And in the examples it is defined as 'can't' with hindi. So I think that it is also ok to define it and use it as the word 'can' ?
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Aug 02 2019, 10:22am CST ~ 3 weeks, 3 days ago. 
@stevesmi
That sounds right. With the one caveat that it shouldn't be used as "can" to ask permission.
 
Ex: "Can I go to the restroom?," you would not use "kaya."
("kaya" would be "Do I have the ability to go to the restroom?" )
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Aug 05 2019, 1:27am CST ~ 3 weeks, 0 days ago. 
@stevesmi
 
“Kaya” may be used to mean “can” but limited to the sense of “being able to, despite real or perceived obstacles”. In other cases, “puwede/pwede” is what you use for “can/may”.
 
Puwede mong ubusin ang cake kung kaya mo. = You can/may finish the cake if you can.
 
Sabi ng doktór pwede na akóng bumangon kung kaya ko na. = The doctor said that I may/can already get out of bed if I already can.
 
Kung kaya mong gayahin ang boses ni Frank Sinatra, puwéde/kaya mo bang kantahín ang “My Way”? = If you can imitate the voice of Frank Sinatra, can you sing “My Way”? - The choice between “pwede” and “kaya” would depend on whether the one asking is simply making a request (pwede) or determining if the other person knows the song and has the voice range to sing it (kaya).
 
Kaya kong akyatín ang bundók, pero hindi ko kaya sa loób ng isáng araw. Pwéde/Kaya siguro sa loób ng dalawáng araw. = I can climb the mountain, but I can’t do it within a day. Maybe I can within two days. - In the second sentence, either “puwede” or “kaya” may be used depending on whether it’s the possibility in time (pwede) or the physical ability (kaya) that’s being referred to.
 
“Kaya” may be used to mean “can” but limited to the sense of “being able to, despite real or perceived obstacles”. In other cases, “puwede/pwede” is what you use for “can/may”.
 
Puwede mong ubusin ang cake kung kaya mo. = You can/may finish the cake if you can.
 
Sabi ng doktór pwede na akóng bumangon kung kaya ko na. = The doctor said that I may/can already get out of bed if I already can.
 
Kung kaya mong gayahin ang boses ni Frank Sinatra, puwéde/kaya mo bang kantahín ang “My Way”? = If you can imitate the voice of Frank Sinatra, can you sing “My Way”? - The choice between “pwede” and “kaya” would depend on whether the one asking is simply making a request (pwede) or determining if the other person knows the song and has the voice range to sing it (kaya).
 
Kaya kong akyatín ang bundók, pero hindi ko kaya sa loób ng isáng araw. Pwéde/Kaya siguro sa loób ng dalawáng araw. = I can climb the mountain, but I can’t do it within a day. Maybe I can within two days. - In the second sentence, either “puwede” or “kaya” may be used depending on whether it’s the possibility in time (pwede) or the physical ability (kaya) that’s being referred to.
 
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