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Please help. I hear colloquialisms in everyday chatting. Is Sabi

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Author Photo by: stevesmi Rating: 0
Jul 17 2019, 12:24am CST ~ 5 mos., 1 day ago. 
Please help. I hear colloquialisms in everyday chatting. Is Sabi Ko a contraction of Sinabi Ko ? Like S'abi Ko ? Is Tas na a contraction of Tapos na ? Like Ta's na? Is there a list of not exactly slang but accepted contractions like we have can't and don't etc ?
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Jul 17 2019, 10:33am CST ~ 5 mos., 1 day ago. 
@stevesmi
I've noticed a lot of times the root of a word will be used in casual speech instead of the full conjugation. So yes, "sabi ko" is short for "sinabi ko." Tagalog loves their shortcuts, and there are a ton of them!
 
Working on this dictionary, I've added a lot of these shortcuts to the search algorithm...I think it would be too large to give a list here.
 
The most common ones I've noticed are 't to the end of a word to add "at" to the sentence, and adding 'y to a word for adding the word "ay" to the sentence.
 
Another common one that is hard to figure intuitively is sometimes I'll see or "ba't" for "bakit".
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Jul 25 2019, 6:10am CST ~ 4 mos., 23 days ago. 
@stevesmi
 
Yes, “sinabi ko” is the same as “sabi ko”. However, only “sinabi” can be used as a verb.
 
SINABI ko kay Mary na nandito ka na. = I TOLD Mary that you’re already here.
 
Wala siyang SINABI sa akin. = She DID not SAY anything to me.
 
- We use “sinabi” in both sentences because it is the verb of the sentences.
 
When “ang” comes before “sinabi”, we often can also use ”sabi”, but there are times when one is more appropriate than the other. (When there’s an “ang” before them, they no longer function as the main verb of the sentence.)
 
When we are citing or referring to something verbatim, we tend to use “sinabi”.
 
Ano ANG sinabi mo? = What did you say (word for word)?
Ano ANG sabi mo? = What did you say (in essence)?
 
Hindi ganun ANG sinabi ko. = That’s not what I said. (I did not use those exact words.)
Hindi ganun ANG sabi ko. = That’s not what I said. (That’s not what I said/meant.)
 
When what we mean is “according to” and only expressing the gist of what was said, we tend to use “sabi”.
 
ANG sabi sa Bibliya… = According to the Bible…
ANG sabi ni Mary, salamat daw at nandito ka na. = Mary said she’s grateful that you’re already here. (The speaker is most likely just relaying the general idea of what Mary said.)
 
I don’t think I’ve heard “ta’s na” as a substitute for “tapós na” (finished already – stress is on “pos”). I also don’t think it would be right to do so.
 
There is, however, the word “tapos” (stress is on “ta”) that is the short form of “pagkatapos” (and then) which we use to link a series of events. Some of us might use “ta’s” in such narratives although I would consider it rather as a tendency to baby talk.
 
Pumunta si Mary dito, pagkatapos/tapos/ta’s pumunta siya sa mall, pagkatapos/tapos/ta’s pumunta siya sa inyo. = Mary went here, and then she went to the mall, and then she went to your place.
 
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Author Photo Dakila Rating: 0
Jul 25 2019, 10:18am CST ~ 4 mos., 23 days ago. 
In the example mentioned, why do you use “siyang” instead of “niyang”? Isn’t sinabi an object focused verb?
 
Wala siyang SINABI sa akin. = She DID not SAY anything to me.
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Jul 25 2019, 11:56pm CST ~ 4 mos., 22 days ago. 
@Dakila
 
Good for you to notice that.
 
It has to do with the use of the word “wala” in the sentence.
 
There are two Filipino words that alter the nature of an object-focus verb. These are “wala” and “mayroon/meron”. There are three words if we’ll include “may”, which gives the same meaning as “mayroon”. “May” and “mayroon” though are not directly interchangeable.
 
“Mayroon/Meron” (there + "to be") and “wala” (there + "to be" + none) have their own rules on usage.
 
1. When they are used as modifiers of nouns or verbs, they are followed by the “na” linker. That’s why you will often see them as “mayroong/merong” and “walang” because “mayroon na” = “mayroong” and “wala na” = “walang”.
 
Mayroon. = There is/are/was/etc..
Wala. = (There is/are/was/etc.) None.
 
Mayroong/May tao sa kuwarto. = There is a person in the room.
Walang tao sa kuwarto. = There is no person in the room.
 
Mayroong/May natutulog. = There is someone sleeping.
Walang natutulog. = There is no one sleeping.
 
2. When they are used with actor/subject-focus verbs, THEY REPLACE THE ACTOR/SUBJECT.
 
Kumain SI John NG tinapay. = John ate bread.
Kumain SIYA NG tinapay. = He ate bread.
 
Mayroong/May kumain NG tinapay. = There was someone who ate bread/the bread.
Walang kumain NG tinapay. = There was no one who ate bread/the bread.
 
3. When they are used with object-focus verbs:
 
A. THEY REPLACE THE OBJECT AND THE ACTOR BECOMES THE SUBJECT. As the subject, the use of “si” and “ang” would then apply.
 
Binasa NI John ANG libró. = ANG libro ay binasa NI John. = John read the book.
Mayroong/May binasa SI John. = SI John ay mayroong/may binasa. = John read something.
Walang binasa SI John. = SI John ay walang binasa. = John read nothing.
 
Kinain NG pusa ANG tinapay. = ANG tinapay ay kinain NG pusa. = The cat ate the bread.
Mayroong kinain ANG pusa. = ANG PUSA ay mayroong/may kinain. = The cat ate something.
Walang kinain ANG pusa. = ANG pusa ay walang kinain. = The cat ate nothing.
 
B. if the actor is represented by a pronoun (which would normally be in THE POSSESSIVE FORM – ko, mo, niya, etc.), it CHANGES TO THE FORM OF A SUBJECT PRONOUN (ako, ka (ikaw), siya, etc.) and immediately follows it. The linker “na” then gets attached to the pronoun instead. (This rule applies to your question.)
 
Binasa NIYA ANG libró. = ANG libro ay binasa NIYA. = He read the book.
Mayroon SIYANG binasa. = SIYA ay mayroong/may binasa. = He read something.
Wala SIYANG binasa. = SIYA ay walang binasa. = He read nothing. (This applies to your question.)
 
Kinain NIYA ANG tinapay. = He ate the bread.
Mayroon SIYANG kinain. = SIYA ay mayroong/may kinain. = He/It ate something.
Wala SIYANG kinain. = SIYA ay walang kinain. = He ate nothing.
 
Applying the above:
 
Walang sinabi SI Mary sa akin. = SI Mary ay walang sinabi sa akin. = Mary did not say anything to me/Mary said nothing to me.
Wala SIYANG sinabi sa akin. = SIYA ay walang sinabi sa akin. = She did not say anything to me/She said nothing to me. (This was my example.)
 
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