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A sentence in Rosetta Stone: "Gusto ng aso ng maiinom." = "Th

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Author Photo by: Diegocorry Rating: 0
Sep 05 2019, 5:34pm CST ~ 2 mos., 8 days ago. 
A sentence in Rosetta Stone: "Gusto ng aso ng maiinom." = "The dog likes to drink." (?)
(1) Is the sentence, as written, equivalent to "Gusto ng aso uminom"?
(2) If the answer to (1) is "no", what is the difference in meanings?
(3) Is there a reason I can't find "maiinom" in the TL dictionary?
As always, thank you. Any help is greatly appreciated.
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Author Photo leosmith Rating: 0
Sep 06 2019, 12:46am CST ~ 2 mos., 7 days ago. 
I don't know the answer. I don't know the verb mainom, but if we assume it's an AF ma-verb, we could say
Maiinom ang aso ng tubig. = The dog will drink water.
adding pseudo verb gusto and ditching the water,
Gusto ng asong mainom.
Which isn't close to your sentence, so I'm lost. But maybe that free ng is supposed to be the linker, lol.
 
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Sep 06 2019, 7:13am CST ~ 2 mos., 7 days ago. 
@Diegocorry
 
I’m a litle confused, too...maybe a native speaker can speak up.
 
1.) & 2.) Looking at other texts, it’s not super common, it seems...our ExampleFinder found just 31 uses in 280 novels worth of text,...although that could just mean it’s more common in spoken word than written text. Most of those uses mean either “drinkable” (“maiinom na tubig” = drinkable water) or the verb for “able to drink”. Sometimes the word is used as a noun for “drink/beverage.”
 
It seems, in this example, it could be either a noun for “drink,” or verb for the ability to drink...The structure of the sentence makes it look like a noun, but then the Rosetta sentence translation seems wrong in EITHER or those cases.
 
I looked up the word in my 3 favorite physical dictionaries and did not find any entries for “maiinom.”
 
3.) It’s just a weird thing (to English speakers) that every affix permutation just isn’t practical to add to a dictionary...there are just too many ways to assemble affixes! This is a major frustration for new students. We try to help a little with this dictionary by automatically showing root meanings for a search (if an exact match can’t be found), and also including the blue “Other Dictionaries” link in the search results, which you can use to quickly search a number of other Tagalog dictionaries to see if they have the word in their dictionaries. We’re growing the number of entries in this dictionary every month, too. We focus on adding entries for the most commonly used words based on the data we have...which means that even though our dictionary may have fewer entries than some others, it covers more text overall because it’s hyperfocused on having entries for the most commonly used words.
 
We’re also working on the Affix Analysis tool (still in progress) and when it’s ready I’ll add it to the dictionary search...so if an exact match doesn’t show up, you can run the Affix Analysis tool to see what potential meanings the word might have using different matching affix patterns.
 
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Author Photo Diegocorry Rating: 0
Sep 06 2019, 7:37am CST ~ 2 mos., 7 days ago. 
@TLDCAdmin Thank you! Believe me, I get the affix thing and realize the difficulty keeping ahead of the game. At the risk of adding more confusion (or maybe it will help clarify): in the same Rosetta Stone lesson they use the word "makakain" as in, "Gusto niya makakain." Again, a common "um" word with a "ma" prefix.
 
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Author Photo TLDCAdmin Rating: 0
Sep 06 2019, 8:00am CST ~ 2 mos., 7 days ago. 
@Diegocorry
Maka- is a common actor focused “abilitive” affix meaning the ability to do something. So, “makakain” would mean “to be able to eat.” “Gusto niyang makakain.” = He would like to (be able to) eat.
 
There is a similar object focused affix “ma-“ also meaning the ability to do the verb...which could be the meaning in your first sentence, too...but then English translation doesn’t seem quite right in that case to me....if it were the abilitive form of inom, it seems like the translation would be “The dog would like to drink something. -or- The dog would like to (be able to) drink.”
 
So...I’m a little confused still, too.
 
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Author Photo Diegocorry Rating: 0
Sep 06 2019, 8:33am CST ~ 2 mos., 7 days ago. 
@TLDCAdmin I'm still getting used to the extensive resources here, and often forget about the Example Finder. Certainly, at least one of the examples there seems to treat "maiinom" as a noun and "makakain" as an abilitative: "...ang studio ay nag-alok ng maiinom at makakain ang maginoong binata." It still leaves me confused about the Rosetta Stone usage from which I might infer that adding the "ma" prefix to an "um" verb and doubling the first syllable equals a noun.
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Sep 07 2019, 6:30am CST ~ 2 mos., 6 days ago. 
@Diegocorry
 
Depending on where the stress falls, “mainom” can take different verb meanings and even be considered as a noun.
 
1. Mainóm (to be able to drink something; object-focus): nainóm, naíinóm, maíinóm
 
Nainóm mo na ba ang gamót mo? = Have you already taken your medicine?
 
2. Máinom (to unwittingly or unwillingly drink something; object-focus): náinom, náiinom, máiinom
 
Náinom niya ang malíng gamót. = He drank the wrong medicine.
 
The present and future tense forms of “máinom” - náiinom, máiinom - are at times used like nouns representing the object (something) of the action or modifiers of the object. Used this way, the action becomes basic or plain, i.e., the unwitting/unwilling sense no longer applies.
 
That is what you have in:
 
"Gusto ng aso ng MÁIINOM." = "The dog would like SOMETHING TO DRINK." - as the object
 
“Gusto ng aso ng MÁIINOM na tubig”. = The dog would like some water FOR DRINKING. - as modifier
 
This treatment of the “ma-” verb form like a noun may also be applied to some other verbs to refer to their objects. The “na-” and “ma-” prefixes also carry their present (at any time) and future (prospective) meanings.
 
mákakain – something that may be eaten
Pumunta ka sa kusina at maraming MÁKAKAIN doon. = Go to the kitchen and there’s lots of STUFF YOU CAN EAT there.
 
nábibili – something that may be bought
Karamihan sa mga bagay na NÁBIBILI ngayon ay mga gawa sa China. = Most of the things that CAN BE BOUGHT nowadays are made in China.
 
@leosmith
Maiinom ang aso ng tubig. = The water will be able to drink the dog.
Iinom ang aso ng tubig. = The dog will drink water.
 
Gusto ng asong mainom. = The dog would like to be drunk (by someone).
 
@TLDCAdmin
Gusto niyang makakain. = He would like to be able to eat.
Gusto niya ng mákakain. = He would like something to eat.
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Sep 07 2019, 7:17am CST ~ 2 mos., 6 days ago. 
@TLDCAdmin
 
BTW, the prefixes here are not the same:
Gusto niyang makakain. = He would like to be able to eat. - prefix is "maka-"
Gusto niya ng mákakain. = He would like something to eat. - prefix is "ma-"
 
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Author Photo Diegocorry Rating: 0
Sep 07 2019, 10:33am CST ~ 2 mos., 6 days ago. 
@Tagamanila Another great lesson! Thank you so much! One of the characteristics of Rosetta Stone is that they don't provide translations, and sometimes - as in this case - I just can't get the meaning. Perhaps learners would be better served if RS did offer an occasional explanation in cases like this where the possibility for confusion abounds. On the other hand, if they did that then I wouldn't have to query this forum and receive the delightful and valuable lessons that I do! ;-)
 
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Author Photo BoraMac Rating: 0
Sep 09 2019, 8:46am CST ~ 2 mos., 4 days ago. 
@TagaManila

BTW, the prefixes here are not the same:
Gusto niyang makakain. = He would like to be able to eat. - prefix is "maka-"
Gusto niya ng mákakain. = He would like something to eat. - prefix is "ma-"
 
Confused...aren't we naka...nakaka...makaka...or we are REALLY attributing the maka infinitive to the aso? The dog...likes...to be ABLE to eat?
 
The dog THINKS in ABILITIVE...INFINITIVEs?
 
May ganun? Talagaaaaah?
 
Sirrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr...thats a deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeep tagalog.
 
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Author Photo BoraMac Rating: 0
Sep 09 2019, 8:51am CST ~ 2 mos., 4 days ago. 
@BoraMac
 
Whatever the answer...assume the sentence for this aso..niya:
 
Gusto niyang makakakain = ? Anong Translation
 
Gusto niyang nakakakain = ? Anong Translation
 
Salamat!
 
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Author Photo Tagamanila Rating: 0
Sep 09 2019, 9:58pm CST ~ 2 mos., 4 days ago. 
@BoraMac
 
In the 2 sentences that you cited, I was illustrating there the difference in the meaning of "makakain" brought about by where the stress is placed. I was not talking about a dog nor did I use "aso" (dog) in the sentence.
 
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